Danish Reaction Battle Group Validated by Exercise White Sword

Read Time2 Minute, 21 Second
7 DEC 2015
OKSBOEL, Denmark – The 2nd Brigade of the Danish Army along with the British Army’s Scots Guards and Coldstream Guards and a detachment of four U.S. Apache helicopters are currently participating in Exercise White Sword, which began Nov. 30 at Oksboel Training Area, Denmark.
White Sword is the final exercise before the Danish Reaction Battle Group becomes a part of NATO Response Force 2015.
“This Monday in London the Danish Secretary of Defence signed a letter on the Joint Expeditionary Force (JEF) and that’s a political framework, but to build actual interoperability that really is worthwhile you need to train it on the ground,” said Brig. Gen. Jens Garly, commander, 2nd Danish Brigade. “Units train together showing the alliance, our home audiences, and possible not friends of ours that we actually do train together on a continuous basis. I think that’s key. That’s NATO on the ground not in Brussels. That’s NATO on the ground in the future I think.”

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Danish forces defend against a counter attack during Exercise White Sword. The 2nd Brigade of the Danish Army along with the British Army’s Scots Guards and Coldstream Guards and a detachment of four U.S. Apache helicopters are currently participating in Exercise White Sword. White Sword is the final exercise before the Danish Reaction Battle Group becomes a part of NATO Response Force 2015. – NATO Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Danielle Brandt, USN

The focus of the exercise is command and control while utilizing various manned combat units. The Danish 2nd Brigade will incorporate U.K. and U.S. forces as an integrated part of the Battle Group in order to increase interoperability with NATO international partners.
“There’s not going to be any scenario I can think of in the immediate future where the UK is deploying independently,” said 2nd Lieutenant Ollie Carmichael, Scots Guards company second in command. “Any conflicts are going to require a multi-national response team and therefore this exercise is one means of developing the level of interoperability between NATO members.”
Exercises like these help to integrate units between Allied Nations, improving communication as well as exposing them to things such as new languages, equipment, terrain, and tactical procedures, assisting forces in moving toward the goal of improved interoperability.
“It’s the planning, the understanding, the mutual respect, knowing each other’s capabilities and you cannot do that without training together,” said Garly. “We train together to be able to fight together.”
Throughout the exercise, allied forces work together to execute missions, utilizing effective communication to learn and enhance training goals as well as send the message that NATO is dedicated to enhancing security measures throughout Europe with its assurance measures.

Source: NATO

By

L. J. De Rothschild

Senior Editor

NATO Section

About Post Author

Robert Williams

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