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NNS170227-21. Naval War College Students Compete for Strategy Award
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99070

NNS170227-20. Legal, Military Issues in Space are Focus of NWC Forum
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=98889

NNS170227-15. Port Hueneme Seabees Celebrate 75 Years
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99062

NNS170227-14. Navy Announces Female Dress Uniform and Cover Survey
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99063

NNS170227-09. Coronado Returns to Singapore Following Operations at Sea
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99053

NNS170227-02. Information Warfare Breaks Regional, Geographic Boundaries at WEST 2017
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99054

NNS170227-03. Battle of Iwo Jima Veteran Visits USS Iwo Jima
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99049

DNU — The Weekly Wire Rundown is a weekly video blog from the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel, highlighting the top stories affecting Sailors and their families. The video compliments the print edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire, which you can subscribe to by e-mailing usnpeople@gmail.com. It can also be downloaded at www.navy.mil/cnp. We welcome any question and feedback on personnel matters or how to make this product better serve Sailors and their families.
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22105

DNU — US, Oman, France, UK Commence Exercise Khunjar Haad, Maritime Commanders Discuss Sea Service Priorities
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22106

NNS170227-16. All Hands Update
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99064

NNS011213-38. This Day in Naval History – Feb. 27
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=367

Eye on the Fleet – U.S. Navy Photo of The Day
http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=232665

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NNS170227-21. Naval War College Students Compete for Strategy Award

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jess Lewis, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. (NNS) — Participants in the annual competition for the James V. Forrestal Award for Excellence in Strategy Development and Force Planning at U.S. Naval War College (NWC) presented creative, flexible, and realistic approaches to dealing with a scenario presented by faculty, according to one of the judges of the Feb. 24 event.

The National Security Affairs (NSA) Department at NWC hosted this year’s National Security Decision Making (NSDM) final exercise. The NSDM exercise serves as the capstone for the senior-level core trimester of study in future-oriented national security affairs at the strategic level. For the exercise, the NSDM students were divided into 16 different groups, called seminars.

“The purpose of the final exercise is to provide our students the opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of NSDM course concepts that they have learned during the 11-week trimester,” said Jim Cook, associate professor of NSA and one of the course leaders. “Additionally, we want to expose the seminars to the challenge of making tough, strategic choices in a resource-constrained environment and to effectively communicate their rationale to senior leadership.”

During the event, Seminar 15 and Seminar 12, qualified as finalists and competed for NWC’s James V. Forrestal Award for Excellence in Strategy Development and Force Planning. Each of the seminars gave a 45-minute, executive-level presentation to a senior judging panel and then answered questions.

The presentations included an assessment of trends in the global security environment looking out over the next 20 years, the key themes for a national security strategy, a nested national military strategy and associated operational concepts or ways to address the challenges and opportunities of this future security environment. They also discussed a force plan for “Joint Force 2027” within rigid budget constraints, and an implementation case of some features of these strategies, operational concepts, or force plan which demonstrates the leadership challenges in bringing an innovative idea to practical achievement.

The winning team was Seminar 12.

Members of the winning team included Marine Lt. Col. Aaron Angell, Army Lt. Col. Burke Bristow, Cmdr. Diane Cua, Air Force Col. James Hackbarth, Cmdr. Mitchel Kloewer, Marine Col. Toby Moore, Army Lt. Col. Patrick Pflaum, Lt. Cmdr. Jared Simsic, Michael Stutzman, Coast Guard Capt. Mark Vislay, Korean navy Cmdr. Byungo Kang, Tunisia navy Cmdr. Ahmed Lajmi, and Cmdr. Ronald Piret.

The judging panel included Capt. Paul A. Strader, director, Navy Policy Division; David S.C. Chu, president, Institute for Defense Analyses; and Ambassador Paula J. Dobriansky, foreign policy expert and former diplomat specializing in national security affairs.

The NSDM trimester is part of NWC’s yearlong resident program and is designed to prepare senior-level joint and international officers and civilians for executive positions in large national security organizations. Major attention is given to joint and allied perspectives at the theater level or above and studies stress the growing complexity of decision making at higher levels of responsibility and authority.

NWC is an upper-level professional military education institution which includes a one-year resident program which graduates 600 resident students each year, and a multifaceted distance education program which graduates more than 1,000 students per year. Its missions include educating and developing leaders, helping define the future of the Navy, supporting combat readiness, and strengthening maritime partnerships. Students earn Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) credit and either a diploma or a master’s degree in national security and strategic studies or defense and strategic studies.

Established in 1884, U.S. Naval War College is the oldest institution of its kind in the world. More than 50,000 students have graduated since its first class of nine students in 1885, and about 300 of today’s active-duty admirals, generals, and senior executive service leaders are alumni.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Naval War College, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nwc/.
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NNS170227-20. Legal, Military Issues in Space are Focus of NWC Forum

By Daniel L. Kuester, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. (NNS) — Forward-looking experts are gazing skyward in preparation of examining military and legal issues being created as countries explore the security domain of outer space.

A recent conference, “International Legal Implications of Military Space Operations,” brought together experts in law, policy, and academics from around the world to discuss this emerging legal topic.

The conference was sponsored by Stockton Center for the Study of International Law at U.S. Naval War College (NWC), Newport, Rhode Island; Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict, Cambridge, Massachusetts; and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Regional Delegation for the United States and Canada.

“The organizing members of the conference all agreed that the outer space domain is of growing concern and interest,” said Army Maj. Chad Highfill, Stockton Center professor and organizer of the event. “Governments and corporations increasingly rely on space-based technologies to support many aspects of daily life. Military operations increasingly depend on space-based assets. In light of these trajectories, it is more vital than ever to examine international legal implications of military space operations. The workshop sought to analyze a select array of enduring and emergent legal issues in this area.”

One of the presenters at the workshop, Dale Stephens, director of the Adelaide Research Unit on Military Law at the University of Adelaide, Australia, found the conference an opportunity to help shape the future discussions on the topic.

“This conference establishes the key questions and the fault lines in the area,” said Stephens. “You get a sense of where people’s concerns are. I’m very happy there was a lot of thoughtful consideration of how you apply an analysis of the issues.”

Highfill said the need for discussions is important when exploring this newly-emerging topic.

“While the presentations at the conference were certainly outstanding,” he said, “it’s the discussions they engender that are of the most value in examining the issues raised during this workshop. We work hard to create an environment that encourages timely, relevant, and interesting discussion of the topics.”

Covering this emerging topic requires participation from many areas. Highfill worked to include as many voices as possible.

“This workshop brought together a rich mix of experts in international law pertaining to armed conflict, in space law, and in relevant technologies, with eight foreign participants from seven countries — United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Estonia, Switzerland, Slovakia, and Germany,” said Highfill.

In this field of law there are many legal approaches to issues, and Stephens was eager to discuss opinions from everyone, especially those with whom he disagrees.

“I want to have my ideas challenged by others to just be assured in my mind whether I’m on the right track or not,” he said.

Only through an open exchange of ideas can legal matters gain clarity, said Stephens. “A conference like this enables a more innovative way of thinking in an out-of-the box sort of way.”

As space becomes more commonplace, legal issues will need to be solved, and this conference helped inform those discussions.

“The proliferation of space-based assets and their vital role in supporting both modern-life and military operations compels an examination of the international legal implications of military space operations,” added Highfill. “This workshop brought together a mix of experts for the purpose of exploring a consensus on the governing legal precepts to guide some of [the] most fundamental issues arising in conflict in this domain.”

The papers produced from this workshop will be published in the Stockton Center’s journal “International Law Studies.”

NWC is an upper-level professional military education institution which includes a one-year resident program which graduates 600 resident students each year, and a multifaceted distance education program which graduates more than 1,000 students per year. Its missions include educating and developing leaders, helping define the future of the Navy, supporting combat readiness, and strengthening maritime partnerships. Students earn Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) credit and either a diploma or a master’s degree in national security and strategic studies or defense and strategic studies.

Established in 1884, U.S. Naval War College is the oldest institution of its kind in the world. More than 50,000 students have graduated since its first class of nine students in 1885, and about 300 of today’s active-duty admirals, generals, and senior executive service leaders are alumni.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Naval War College, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nwc/.
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NNS170227-15. Port Hueneme Seabees Celebrate 75 Years

From Naval Construction Group 1 Public Affairs

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. (NNS) — Seabees from around Naval Base Ventura County gathered at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the U.S. Navy Seabees, 150th Anniversary of the Civil Engineer Corps, and 175 years of Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Feb. 25.

More than 1,200 active duty, reserve, and retired Seabees, service members, and civilians crowded two floors of the library to mark the occasion.

Maj. Gen. Daniel O’Donohue, commanding general, 1st Marine Division, attended as the guest of honor, and highlighted the unique characteristics of the Seabees as builders and fighters, their capabilities in expeditionary construction, and honored Seabee veterans in attendance from every conflict since World War II.

“I will never be eloquent enough to talk of the brotherhood and immense mutual respect forged in combat between us, and I will forever answer any call from the Seabees,” said O’Donohue. “Seldom in history has a body of men and women given so much in selfless service in freedom’s cause than the Seabees.”

O’Donohue spoke of his past combat experiences with the Seabees during the invasion of Baghdad. A detachment of Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 21 created roads to cross into Iraq, helped open the port of Umm Qasr, constructed forward operating bases, and worked within his Marine task force to stabilize Al Anbar Province.

“Under the toughest conditions imaginable – those of danger, harsh terrain, extreme weather, and the urgent compression of time when lives and mission are at stake – you are essential to the preparation of any command, committed to the most decisive actions of the fight, and when the smoke clears, instantly in action to provide humanitarian assistance so key to lasting peace,” said O’Donohue.

Following O’Donohue’s remarks, retired Master Chief Equipmentman Jim Daniels, the oldest Seabee in attendance and a veteran of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, joined O’Donohue and the youngest Seabee in attendance, Constructionman Recruit Colin Ryniec, for a ceremonious cake cutting. Following a rendition of the “Song of Seabees,” the attendees celebrated with music and dancing.

The Seabees were created on March 5, 1942, after Adm. Ben Moreell, chief of the Navy’s Bureau of Yards and Docks, recognized the need for a militarized construction force. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Navy saw the formation of naval construction battalions.

With the motto “We Build, We Fight” the Seabees have gone on to construct thousands of miles of roadways and airstrips, entire bases, and thousands of other projects around the world.

Naval Facilities and Engineering Command, established in 1842, is the Navy’s oldest systems command. The Navy Civil Engineer Corps was established in 1867 following the Civil War.

Naval Construction Group (NCG) 1 prepares Pacific Fleet Naval Construction Force units to conduct deliberate construction in support of combatant commanders, numbered fleet commanders, Marine air-ground task forces, and other warfighter requirements.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Naval Construction Group 1, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/ncg1/.
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NNS170227-14. Navy Announces Female Dress Uniform and Cover Survey

By Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy announced Monday that it is asking for female Sailors to provide their opinion in an online female dress uniform and cover survey.

Approximately 8,000 randomly selected female officers and enlisted personnel from various commands across the Fleet were notified of their participation via their command triads and provided instructions on accessing and completing the survey. The online survey will be open for approximately 30 days.

This survey is designed to obtain women’s preference in type and design of various uniforms and components. The Navy last conducted a female uniform survey in 2013.

Survey questions address the level of satisfaction with dress uniforms and covers for both officers and enlisted. Questions on the style and fit of service uniform items are also included.

The results of the female dress uniform and cover survey will be used to inform the Navy’s way ahead on a number of uniform matters we know are of interest to female Sailors. Results will also be delivered to Congress to satisfy requirements of the Fiscal Year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act.

For more information on uniforms and uniform policy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters website at http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/uniforms/pages/default2.aspx.

For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/cnp/.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

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NNS170227-09. Coronado Returns to Singapore Following Operations at Sea

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Amy M. Ressler, USS Coronado (LCS 4) Public Affairs

CHANGI NAVAL BASE, Singapore (NNS) — Following a port visit in Muara, Brunei, and routine operations in the Sulu Sea and South China Sea, littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) pulled pierside at Changi Naval Base in Singapore, Feb. 25.

After completing the four-day port visit in Brunei, Coronado conducted a passing exercise and visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) training at sea with Royal Brunei navy (RBN) patrol vessel Daruttaqwa in the South China Sea. The ship then transitted through the Balabac Strait and into the Sulu Sea for routine operations before heading back to port in Singapore.

“Working alongside the RBN at sea gave our Sailors a unique opportunity to practice operational tactics and enhance bilateral capabilities with a regional partner,” said Cmdr. Scott Larson, commanding officer, Coronado. “Training together increases our interoperability and helps ensure that we are ready to execute real-world operations if called upon.”

Training at sea with a regional partner for the first time while deployed to U.S. 7th Fleet provided unique opportunities for the crew. Lt. j.g. Anthony Grayson, Surface Warfare Det. 2 officer in charge, talked about the importance of the VBSS training.

“Working with the RBN gave the Coronado boarding team a chance to practice our skills onboard a vessel unfamiliar to our team,” said Grayson. “We were able to conduct a realistic scenario while training alongside a trusted partner, raising the readiness of both participating groups by sharing methods and tactics.”

Once operations with the RBN were complete, the Coronado crew maintained a full schedule of unit-level training, including a crew-served weapons exercise, damage control and man overboard drills, small boat and flight operations, and engineering operational checks.

Flight operations with the embarked MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter and MQ-8B Fire Scout unmanned helicopters were a primary focus of the underway according to Lt. Cmdr. Thanh Nguyen, officer in charge, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23 Det. 5.

“Pilots, air crewmen, and maintainers were given the opportunity to refine their skills and proficiency at landing and operating on a ship operating at sea,” said Nguyen. “The gunnery exercise also allowed our sailors to shoot and remain current on our weapons systems.”

The port visit to Brunei included multiple ship tours and a static display of the embarked MH-60S and MQ-8Bs for the Royal Brunei air force. Coronado Sailors also participated in a sports day with RBN counterparts, competing in a soccer game and tug-of-war match at the Naval Training Center in Muara, Brunei.

Currently on a rotational deployment in U.S. 7th Fleet, Coronado is a fast and agile warship tailor-made to patrol the region’s littorals and work hull-to-hull with partner navies, providing 7th Fleet with the flexible capabilities it needs now and in the future.

On behalf of Commander, Task Force 73, Destroyer Squadron 7 serves as operational commander for littoral combat ships rotationally deployed to 7th Fleet, and conducts advanced planning, organizes resources, and directly supports the execution of maritime engagements such as the Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercise series, the Naval Engagement Activity (NEA) with Vietnam, and the multilateral Southeast Asia Cooperation and Training (SEACAT) exercise with Bangladesh, Cambodia, Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Commander, Task Force 73, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/ctf73/.
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NNS170227-02. Information Warfare Breaks Regional, Geographic Boundaries at WEST 2017

By Dawn M. Stankus, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command Public Affairs

SAN DIEGO (NNS) — WEST 2017 concluded Feb. 23 following three-days of speakers, panels, demonstrations, and capability displays.

Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR), alongside the Office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance (N2N6), hosted the information warfare (IW) pavilion on the exposition floor for the second consecutive year. The critical man, both Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet and Navy Information Forces Command showcased train and equip IW missions.

Electronics Technician 1st Class Antonio Munoz, SPAWAR Systems Center Pacific, served as a subject matter expert during WEST in the IW pavilion for the Heterogeneous Autonomous Maritime Mobile Expeditionary Robot (HAMMER).

“HAMMER supports surface, subsurface, and air mission areas,” said Munoz. “It is designed to respond to unknown threats, so that we do not have to risk the lives of [explosive ordnance disposal] service members. Attendees of WEST were completely surprised that this type of technology even exists, especially because HAMMER does multiple missions autonomously, all while being powered by wind and solar technology. HAMMER is only one example of something innovative that exists now for our Sailors to use in the fleet.”

Munoz continued to explain his excitement for having the opportunity to showcase HAMMER at WEST this year.

“It was pretty amazing to be at WEST,” said Munoz. “Not only did I represent SPAWAR and the tremendous technology being developed, but I also represented the U.S. Navy Reserves. I am currently serving extended time on active duty and I am very proud to showcase how the Reserve community supports the information warfare mission.”

Vice Adm. Jan Tighe, N2N6 and director of naval intelligence, explained during an IW leadership panel how cyber and digital warfighting looks on a global scale.

“We have to operate differently than we have in the past,” said Tighe. “Operators of our information warfare systems need to integrate with the engineers and the designers, so that we can quickly find digital approaches to solve problems and move forward with solutions. Battlespace awareness, combined with integrated fires and assured command and control, will allow us to get to a better place and get the requirement right.”

Adm. John Richardson, chief of naval operations; Gen. Robert Neller, commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps; and Adm. Paul Zukunft, commandant of the Coast Guard, discussed the importance of working across all sea services in the information warfare domain during the closing luncheon of WEST 2017.

Richardson emphasized the important role information technologies have on the future of the fleet.

“The operating concepts that will allow us to continue to be competitive and win in the future [include] directed energies, unmanned technologies, artificial intelligence, and additive manufacturing,” said Richardson.

Richardson continued to stress communicating and coordinating across all services will provide necessary standards and consistency in warfighting environments.

“Providing the data standards and the communication standards — not only within the Navy, but with our sister services — [will allow us] to communicate, sense, and target together … that’s going to be a real force multiplier,” said Richardson.

Neller complemented Richardson’s comments by emphasizing information warfare is not a mission area restricted by a region or geographic location.

“All of us recognize that [information warfare and cyber are] not bounded geographically, even though the effect may be in a geographical area,” said Neller. “We are going to have to look closely at our training and the gear that we buy [so] we have enough commonality [across services] in order to communicate with each other and help defend each other. We are entering an area where joint training is as important, or more important, than it’s ever been.”

WEST 2018 will be held Feb. 6-8, 2018, at the San Diego Convention Center.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/spawar/.
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NNS170227-03. Battle of Iwo Jima Veteran Visits USS Iwo Jima

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew Murray, USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Public Affairs

MAYPORT, Fla. (NNS) — On Feb. 19, 1945, the first American forces landed on the island of Iwo Jima, southeast of mainland Japan.

Bombarded by U.S. air strikes and bombings, the Japanese had taken to an intricate network of caves and tunnels, popping out to ambush U.S. forces as they inched their way across the scarred and battered land.

A little more than 72 years later, former Marine Cpl. Bob Gasche, an Iwo Jima veteran, visited the Navy ship which carries the island’s namesake — amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) homeported at Naval Station Mayport, Florida. Gasche took a few moments during his visit for an all-hands call with the crew on the ship’s flight deck.

“It was quite a trip,” said Gasche. “We landed on February 19. The wave I went in was under light fire, but that wasn’t what got to me and the others — it was the casualties from the fire we took from Mount Suribachi where they fired down upon us.”

It was just the fifth day of battle when Mount Suribachi was captured and the iconic photograph of the flag being raised at the summit was taken.

“On February 23, one of the significant acts of our history was the raising of the first American flag on the top of Mount Suribachi,” said Gasche. “What it meant to us was not only the symbolism of our nation’s flag flying there, but the fact that they were no longer shooting down on us and causing casualties not by the dozens, folks, but by the hundreds. So we were thankful to see the American flag flying above us — that’s something I’ll never forget as long as I live.”

For the crew of Iwo Jima, hearing the words of Gasche was an overwhelming experience.

“Immediately after he spoke, the first thing I wanted to do was shake his hand,” said Senior Chief Aviation Electronics Technician Mark Petersen. “To listen to someone from that era describe the battle in such detail, and on the ship named after it, was truly a moment I’ll never forget.”

The Battle of Iwo Jima continued until March 26, 1945, when combat operations officially ended. Once secured, the island served as an emergency landing strip for Air Force bombers in the Pacific Ocean, saving countless lives.

Iwo Jima is currently at her homeport acting as the flagship for Exercise Integrated Advance.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), visit http://www.navy.mil/local/lhd7/ or http://www.facebook.com/USSIwoJimaLHD7/.

NNS170227-16. All Hands Update

From Defense Media Activity – Navy

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Daily Report for Monday, February 27, 2017

All Hands Update features three one-minute newscasts.

First one-minute newscast

  • US, Oman, France, UK Commence Exercise Khunjar Haad, Maritime Commanders Discuss Sea Service Priorities

links:
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22106
http://dvidshub.net/r/ac5itj

Second one-minute newscast

  • Transferring to a new command with Fido and Fluffy

links:
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22043
http://dvidshub.net/r/ps7mto

Third one-minute newscast

  • Recent updates to Tuition Assistance change deadlines and requirements.

links:
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22086
http://dvidshub.net/r/qtj2c2

Defense Media Activity-Navy produces All Hands Update (AHU) newscasts each day. AHU can be seen on the Direct-to-Sailor (DTS) satellite television service available aboard 160 ships of the fleet and via the Navy website at www.navy.mil. Check your local DTS program schedule for air times. AHU can also be seen worldwide on American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS).
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NNS011213-38. This Day in Naval History – Feb. 27

From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division

1928 – Cmdr. Theodore G. Ellyson, the Navy’s first aviator, along with Lt. Cmdr. Hugo Schmidt and Lt. Rogers Ransehounsen, crash to their deaths in a Loening Amphibian, a 2-seat amphibious biplane, on a night flight from Norfolk, Va. to Annapolis, Md.

1942 – Seaplane tender USS Langley (AV 3), carrying 32 U.S. Army Air Force P-40 aircraft for the defense of Java, is bombed by Japanese naval land attack planes 75 miles south of Tjilatjap, Java. Due to the damage, Langley is shelled and torpedoed by USS Whipple (DD 217).

1942 – The Battle of the Java Sea begins, where the 14-ship Allied forces (American, Dutch, British and Australian) attempt to stop the 28-ship Japanese invasion of the Dutch East Indies colony of Java. The Japanese, during battles over three days, decimates the Allied forces, sinking at least 11 ships, killing more than 3,370 and taking nearly 1,500 prisoners.

1944 – Three US Navy submarines sink three Japanese cargo ships: Grayback (SS 208) sinks Ceylon Maru in the East China Sea; Cod (SS 244) sinks Taisoku Maru west of Halmahera while Trout (SS 202) sinks Aki Maru.

1945 – Submarine USS Scabbardfish (SS 397) sinks Japanese guardboat No. 6 Kikau Maru, 100 miles northeast of Keelung, Formosa, while USS Blenny (SS 324) attacks a Japanese convoy off French Indochina and sinks merchant tanker Amato Maru off Cape Padaran.

1945 – Land-based patrol aircraft from VPB 112, along with others from three British vessels, HMS Labaun and HMS Loch Fada and HMS Wild Goose, sink German submarine U 327 in the English Channel.

1973 – First airborne mine sweep in a live minefield takes place in the Haiphong, Vietnam ship channel by helicopters from Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron Twelve on board USS New Orleans (LPH 11).
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Karl William

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