U.S Navy News Service

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NNS170301-03. 12th Pacific Partnership Mission Prepares to Enhance Cooperation, Strengthen Indo-Asia-Pacific Ties
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99104

NNS170301-17. Brain Injury Awareness Month
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99119

NNS170301-15. N1 Civilian Employees Visit the Sailors, Commands they Support
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99118

NNS170301-14. Naval War College Graduates 74 in Ceremony
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99114

NNS170301-12. Bataan, Mesa Verde, Carter Hall to Deploy
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99116

NNS170301-09. Green Bay Wraps Up Cobra Gold 2017
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99111

NNS170301-07. HSC-25 Rescues Distressed Mariners in Saipan
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99108

DNU — Design for Maritime Singularity-MMOWGLI, Albuquerque Decommissioned After 33 Years of Service
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22109

DNU — Navy, Sailor, All Hands Update, Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Yokosuka Naval Base, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, SAPR

http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22110

NNS170301-19. All Hands Update
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99124

NNS011215-01. This Day in Naval History – March 01
http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=380

Eye on the Fleet – U.S. Navy Photo of The Day
http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=232826

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NNS170301-03. 12th Pacific Partnership Mission Prepares to Enhance Cooperation, Strengthen Indo-Asia-Pacific Ties

By Commander, Task Force 73 Public Affairs

SINGAPORE (NNS) — The U.S. Navy will join allied and partner nation forces for the 12th Pacific Partnership mission, scheduled to begin March 1.

This annual maritime operation will help improve disaster response preparedness and capacity, while enhancing partnerships with participating nations throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

Pacific Partnership is the largest annual multilateral humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. This year’s mission will be led by the deputy commander and staff from Coastal Riverine Group 1, embarked aboard expeditionary fast transport USNS Fall River (T-EPF 4), and will include more than 200 supporting military and civilian personnel from the U.S., United Kingdom, Australia, Japan, and South Korea.

Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and Vietnam are scheduled to host this year’s Pacific Partnership mission. Medical, dental, civil-engineering, and veterinary teams will partner with host nations to conduct civic-action projects, community health exchanges, medical symposiums, and humanitarian and disaster relief (HA/DR) drills. The planned engagements and exchanges during Pacific Partnership 17 are intended to improve capacity, enhance regional partnerships, and increase multilateral cooperation for HA/DR preparedness.

“Pacific Partnership is helping improve disaster response readiness for more than a decade in dozens of nations,” said Rear Adm. Don Gabrielson, commander, Task Force 73, and executive agent for Pacific Partnership 17. “Disasters threaten us all — they ignore borders, and they disregard national sovereignty. The Indo-Asia-Pacific region averages two large disasters each year, and Pacific Partnership has been a key enabler behind many countries being more prepared today. When the distress call comes, the life-savers know who to call and what to do next because Pacific Partnership helps prepare us to manage the unthinkable.”

Pacific Partnership began in response to one of the world’s most catastrophic natural disasters, the December 2004 tsunami which devastated parts of southeast Asia. The mission has evolved over the years from emphasis on direct care to an operation focused on enhancing partnerships through host nation subject matter expert and civil-military exchanges.

Pacific Partnership 17 will have several other distinctions:

  • Pacific Partnership will conduct mission stops in Vietnam for the fourth consecutive year. The visit by Fall River to Vietnam is in conjunction with the 22nd anniversary of the normalization of diplomatic relations between the United States and Vietnam. Along with events such as the Naval Engagement Activity (NEA) maritime collaboration, Pacific Partnership underscores the deepening relationship between the United States and Vietnam.
  • Pacific Partnership will engage in Sri Lanka for the first time in the 12-year history of the mission. This marks the mission’s initial outreach to south Asia.

  • This year’s mission will return to Malaysia, where the U.S. continues to strengthen ties and cooperation.

  • Pacific Partnership will continue to capitalize on the Women, Peace and Security program — an international initiative designed to not only empower women, but also demonstrate the value of their inclusion in the planning and implementation of disaster preparedness and relief efforts for their respective countries.

“We’ve conducted extensive planning with our host nations and our mission partners over the last six months,” said Capt. Stanfield Chien, deputy commodore of Coastal Riverine Group 1 and Pacific Partnership mission commander. “I’m very pleased with how we’ve come together as a team and are ready to execute this year’s Pacific Partnership mission.”

Additional information on the mission is available at http://www.cpf.navy.mil and Pacific Partnership Facebook and twitter pages.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Commander, Task Force 73, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/ctf73/.
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NNS170301-17. Brain Injury Awareness Month

By Yan Kennon, Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior Writer

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) — March is National Brain Injury Awareness Month, a time to recognize the more than 5 million Americans living with traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related disabilities.

TBI is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head, or a penetrating head injury which disrupts the normal function of the brain. However, not all blows or jolts to the head result in TBI.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), TBI contributes to about 30 percent of all injury deaths in the U.S. each year.

“Know the signs and symptoms of TBI and seek proper care,” said Dr. Kirsten Pollick, Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s neuropsychologist, TBI program director and mental health department head. “The severity of a TBI can range from mild, with a brief change in mental status or consciousness; to severe, with an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia.”

At least 2.5 million children and adults sustain TBIs each year. Of those, about 2.2 million are treated in emergency departments and about 280,000 are hospitalized for TBI-related injuries.

Physical signs and symptoms of TBI include loss of consciousness, state of being dazed, headache, fuzzy or blurry vision, nausea or vomiting, dizziness, sensitivity to light, balance problems, or feeling tired or having no energy.

Some symptoms appear right away, while others might not be noticed for days or months after injury. Children with a brain injury can have the same symptoms as adults, but it’s often harder for them to let others know how they feel.

Leading causes of TBI include falls, being hit by an object, and motor vehicle crashes. Active-duty personnel and Reservists are at an increased risk for sustaining a TBI while deployed to areas with increased risk of blast exposures, such as improvised explosive devices. However, of all new cases of TBI among military personnel, about 80 percent occur in non-deployed settings such as motor vehicle crashes, falls, sports and recreation activities, and assaults.

Individuals with suspected brain injuries should seek medical care immediately by contacting their Medical Home Port team to schedule an urgent care appointment, or for emergencies going to the emergency room or calling 911.

NH Jacksonville patients can be evaluated by the hospital’s TBI screening program after receiving a consultation or referral from their Medical Home Port team, Deployment Health Center, Neurology, or Behavioral Health.

To learn more about brain injury awareness visit the CDC website at http://www.cdc.gov.

To find out more about the hospital’s TBI program, call the program manager at 904-546-6331. For more on deployment services, contact the Deployment Health Center at 904-546-7099.

NH Jacksonville’s priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nation’s heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navy’s third largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population — 163,000 active and retired Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, Airmen, guardsmen, and their families — about 85,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager and Medical Home Port team at one of its facilities.

To find out more or download the command’s mobile app, visit http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nhjax/.
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NNS170301-15. N1 Civilian Employees Visit the Sailors, Commands they Support

From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Twelve civilian employees from the Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP), N1 were given the opportunity to embark naval ships and interact with fleet Sailors during a visit to Norfolk, Tuesday.

The visit allowed those individuals, some with little to no military experience, the chance to “Meet the Fleet,” through a series of tours and command briefs at a variety of units.

“Visits like this provide a special opportunity to actually come out and visit the Fleet, to talk to Sailors and for a brief moment in time, live in their environment,” said Robert Carroll, Head, Navy Uniform Matters Office. “The ability to talk directly with Sailors about various things we work on in policy, their perception of what we do, and their likes and dislikes, gets us a direct unfiltered input.”

The group’s first visit included a tour of U.S. Fleet Forces Command Headquarters where employees were greeted by Al Gonzalez, Director, Fleet Personnel Development and Allocation and Capt. Roger Curry, Assistant Chief of Staff. The group then received a tour of the Maritime Operations Center for Fleet Command Center. Ship tours included the USS Kearsage (LHD-3) where the civilian members ate lunch with Sailors. The group then embarked the USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) followed by a tour of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 2 (HSC-2).

Civilian employees were able to speak with Sailors to discuss how initiatives being created at CNP are implemented in the fleet. Feedback from Sailors helps employees determine how to best improve future personnel initiative, including policy and training, before the initiatives are released Navy-wide.

Employees said the visit was beneficial to their work, and gave them a better understanding of how to best serve Sailors and the Navy.

“During the visit I was able to hear from Sailors and see how our policies and systems, and particularly our IT systems impact them,” said John Huerta, OPNAV N16 program analyst. “While on the USS Kearsarge, I got to see the lives Sailors live each day and the big picture, a different perspective. It brings value to what’s happening in the Navy now and what can happen in the next six to twelve months.”

This was the fourth “Meet the Fleet” visit by CNP/N1 personnel.

For more news from Chief of Naval Personnel, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnp/.
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NNS170301-14. Naval War College Graduates 74 in Ceremony

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jess Lewis, U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs

NEWPORT, R.I. (NNS) — U.S. Naval War College graduated 74 Navy, Marine Corps, and Army officers during a graduation ceremony held in the school’s Spruance Auditorium, Feb. 28.

The graduates from the College of Naval Warfare (CNW) received master’s degrees in national security and strategic studies, while graduates of the College of Naval Command and Staff (CNCS) received master’s degrees in defense and strategic studies — both accredited by the New England Association for Schools and Colleges.

The two programs have coursework in joint military operations, strategy and policy, and national security decision making, which are designed to prepare students to think strategically, critically, and operationally.

The senior-level CNW course graduated 24 officers and the intermediate-level CNCS course graduated 50 officers.

“You have all accomplished quite a bit,” said Army Col. Joseph McGraw, professor of joint-military operation at NWC and the graduation guest speaker. “You have every right and reason to be proud of where you’re sitting and what you’ve accomplished. Embrace your new assignment; think independently without waiting for direction. Use this time you’ve had to think, reflect, and reason and apply the lessons you’ve learned both here at the college and throughout the course of your careers. The joint force needs your ideas and needs your better arguments.”

NWC is a one-year resident program which graduates about 600 resident students and about 1,000 distance learning students each year. Its missions include educating and developing leaders, helping define the future of the Navy, supporting combat readiness, and strengthening maritime partnerships. Students earn Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) credit and either a diploma or a Master of Arts degree.

Established in 1884, U.S. Naval War College is the oldest institution of its kind in the world. More than 50,000 students have graduated since its first class of nine students in 1885, and about 300 of today’s active-duty admirals, generals, and senior executive service leaders are alumni.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Naval War College, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/nwc/.
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NNS170301-12. Bataan, Mesa Verde, Carter Hall to Deploy

From Expeditionary Strike Group 2 Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) — More than 4,000 Sailors and Marines serving in the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group (BAT ARG) are scheduled to deploy soon.

Amphibious transport dock USS Mesa Verde (LPD 19) deploys Feb. 24 from Naval Station Norfolk, amphibious dock landing ship USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) deploys Feb. 25 from Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, and amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) deploys Feb. 28 from Naval Station Norfolk.

Amphibious Squadron 8, Bataan, Mesa Verde, Carter Hall, Assault Craft Unit 4 detachments, Beach Master Unit 2, Tactical Air Control Squadron 21, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 26, and the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit will conduct a scheduled seven-month deployment in support of maritime security operations, crisis response, theater security cooperation, and provide a forward naval presence in Europe and the Middle East.

The 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), deploying from their homeport in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, is comprised of a Ground Combat Element, Battalion Landing Team, Aviation Combat Element, Logistics Combat Element, and its command element.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Expeditionary Strike Group 2, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/esg2/.
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NNS170301-09. Green Bay Wraps Up Cobra Gold 2017

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chris Williamson, USS Green Bay (LPD 20) Public Affairs

SATTAHIP, Thailand (NNS) — Amphibious transport dock USS Green Bay (LPD 20) successfully completed Exercise Cobra Gold 2017 (CG17), Feb. 24, after operating in the Gulf of Thailand and various locations throughout the Kingdom of Thailand.

The 36th iteration of the annual theater security cooperation event took place Jan. 28-Feb. 24.

Throughout the exercise, Green Bay Sailors and Marines assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) worked alongside forces with the Kingdom of Thailand, United States, Singapore, Japan, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, and Malaysia in order to enhance multinational interoperability in the Pacific region.

“Multinational exercises like Cobra Gold are invaluable,” said Capt. Nathan Moyer, Green Bay’s commanding officer. “We take advantage of every opportunity to work with multinational partners. Cobra Gold provides us with an outstanding environment to enhance interoperability and to strengthen regional relationships.”

This year’s exercise consisted of three primary events: a staff exercise, humanitarian civic assistance projects, and a field training exercise. Up to 29 nations participated in CG17, with approximately 3,600 U.S. personnel directly participating both ashore and afloat.

During CG17, Green Bay Sailors and 31st MEU Marines demonstrated their ability to conduct multinational amphibious operations with partner nations throughout the exercise.

“Our Sailors performed magnificently,” said Moyer. “The exercise was very complex and challenging, and it required a lot of flexibility and professionalism from everyone, but we pushed forward and met every mission requirement. Team Green Bay had a great exercise that we can be proud of.”

Even though Green Bay was not at the opening ceremony, Green Bay Sailors helped kick off CG17 with a cultural exchange at the Wat Samnak Thon Elementary School, Feb. 14. During the event, 37 Green Bay Sailors, with Marines and Soldiers from participating commands, travelled to the school to interact with students ages 5-12.

“This event was important because we got to share our cultures and languages in order to embrace our similarities and differences to learn from one another,” said Lt. Tiffany Eddy, Green Bay’s command chaplain.

On Feb. 16, Green Bay participated in a simulated amphibious assault featuring amphibious assault vehicles, helicopters, landing craft utilities, and hundreds of Marines from the 31st MEU.

“The 31st MEU was extremely successful during this exercise,” said Moyer. “The Marines who participated had an opportunity to see different tactics and techniques that the Kingdom of Thailand employs. By becoming more integrated and learning each other’s tactics and procedures, we can operate better in any type of situation.”

While the Marines participated in the field training exercise, Sailors were hard at work on Green Bay’s flight deck, also known as Lambeau Field.

On Feb. 17, Royal Thai navy helicopters landed and took off from Lambeau Field for deck landing qualifications. This event provided training on both sides for the U.S. Sailors and Royal Thai navy pilots and aircrew.

“Even though this was my first time signaling to a Royal Thai navy helicopter, it was exciting being able to assist the pilots with their qualification,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Amado Banosderrickson.

A few days later, Feb. 21 and 22, helicopters from the U.S. Army 25th Combat Aviation Brigade conducted deck landing qualifications with Green Bay, which provided a great opportunity for Green Bay Sailors to hone their skills and become better prepared for real scenarios.

As a result of joint exercises such as Cobra Gold, military branches have had to cross-train with each other. Landing Army helicopters aboard a Navy ship such as Green Bay, although rare, is becoming more important as operations diversify.

“This training is a very unique opportunity to get a wide range of Army pilots deck landing qualified,” said Lt. Cmdr. John Caldecutt, Green Bay’s air boss. “We were privileged to give them the chance to gain proficiency in a skill set they rarely use.”

Later in the evening, Feb. 22, Green Bay pulled into Sattahip, Thailand, to wrap up CG17. During the port visit, Green Bay visited with Royal Thai navy leaders and re-embarked elements and equipment of the 31st MEU which stayed on the beach.

“We were able to achieve all our goals of interoperability and training by working side-by-side with our Thai counterparts,” said Moyer. “We were additionally able to learn some lessons from our Thai counterparts and we greatly appreciate their hospitality to our Sailors and Marines.”

Cobra Gold is an annual joint/coalition multinational exercise and is the latest in the continuing series of U.S.-Thai military exercises designed to ensure regional peace and stability. The U.S. has been treaty allies with Thailand for more than 180 years and formal treaty allies for more than 60 years.

Green Bay is on a routine patrol, operating in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region to enhance partnerships and be a ready-response force for any type of contingency.

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from USS Green Bay (LPD 20), visit http://www.navy.mil/local/lpd20/.
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NNS170301-07. HSC-25 Rescues Distressed Mariners in Saipan

From Joint Region Marianas Public Affairs

ASAN, Guam (NNS) — Sailors from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 25 conducted a search and rescue (SAR) operation and retrieved two distressed mariners off the coast of Saipan, Feb. 25.

Upon the request of U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam, a Navy MH-60S Knight Hawk helicopter from HSC-25 launched from Andersen Air Force Base to Saipan at 2:45 p.m. At 10:20 p.m., Navy personnel safely recovered the individuals from their vessel and brought them to the Saipan International Airport.

“This incident is an example of the types of situations our Sailors train for, day-in and day-out,” said HSC-25 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Edward Weiler. “In an era where most missions and training exercises are planned well in advance, SAR is a unique mission that [involves] time-critical problem solving and decision making.”

HSC-25 is the Navy’s only forward-deployed MH-60S expeditionary squadron. As a part of Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Pacific, it provides an armed helicopter capability for U.S. 7th Fleet in support of logistics, search and rescue, and humanitarian assistance missions.

HSC-25 is also the only squadron which maintains a 24-hour search and rescue and medical evacuation alert posture, directly supporting the U.S. Coast Guard and Joint Region Marianas.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from U.S. Naval Forces, Marianas, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/guam/.

NNS170301-19. All Hands Update

From Defense Media Activity – Navy

WASHINGTON (NNS) — Daily Report for Wednesday, March 01, 2017

All Hands Update features three one-minute newscasts.

First one-minute newscast

  • Design for Maritime Singularity-MMOWGLI, Albuquerque Decommissioned After 33 Years of Service

links:
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22109
http://dvidshub.net/r/8lx58c

Second one-minute newscast

  • Yokosuka holds SAPR training.

links:
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22110
http://dvidshub.net/r/kmhijw

Third one-minute newscast

  • How service members can protect their personal identifiable information.

links:
http://www.navy.mil/viewVideo.asp?id=22009
http://dvidshub.net/r/j4xicv

Defense Media Activity-Navy produces All Hands Update (AHU) newscasts each day. AHU can be seen on the Direct-to-Sailor (DTS) satellite television service available aboard 160 ships of the fleet and via the Navy website at www.navy.mil. Check your local DTS program schedule for air times. AHU can also be seen worldwide on American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS).
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NNS011215-01. This Day in Naval History – March 01

From Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division

1865 – Side-wheel steamship Harvest Moon, while underway near Georgetown, S.C., with Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren on board, hits a Confederate mine (or “torpedo” in contemporary terms) and sinks with the loss of one of her crew.

1942 – Naval Reserve pilot Ensign William Tepuni, flying a Lockheed Hudson reconnaissance, light bombing and transport aircraft (PBO) from VP-82 Squadron based at Naval Air Station Argentia, Newfoundland, Canada, attacks and sinks German submarine U 656 southwest of Newfoundland. It is the first U-boat sunk by U.S. forces in World War II.

1953 – During the Korean War, USS Valley Forge (CVA 45) aircraft raid the No.1 power plant at Chosen, Korea and heavily damage the strongly defended industrial site.

1991 – Following USS Missouri’s (BB 63) bombardment of Faylaka Island during Operation Desert Storm, hundreds of Iraqi soldiers wave white flags and surrender to the battleships Remotely Piloted Vehicle (RPV) flying overhead.
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Karl William

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