Category: Terrorism

Somali Pirate Sentenced to Life for 2010 Attack on USS Ashland


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Somali Pirate Sentenced to Life for 2010 Attack on USS Ashland

Mohamed Farah, 31, of Somalia, was sentenced to life plus 10 years in prison for engaging in piracy and committing other offenses pertaining to the attack on the USS Ashland, a U.S. Navy ship, in April 2010.

Today’s announcement was made by Acting Assistant Attorney General for National Security Mary B. McCord, U.S. Attorney Dana J. Boente for the Eastern District of Virginia, Special Agent in Charge Martin Culbreth of the FBI’s Norfolk Field Office in Virginia, and Special Agent in Charge Maureen Evans of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service’s (NCIS) Norfolk Field Office. The sentence was issued by U.S. District Judge Raymond A. Jackson.

A federal jury convicted Farah on Feb. 27, 2013. According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, Farah and five co-conspirators attacked the USS Ashland on April 10, 2010. Four of Farah’s co-conspirators were previously sentenced for their roles in the attack: Jama Idle Ibrahim (15 years in prison), Mohamed Ali Said (33 years), Mohamed Abdi Jama (life plus 30 years) and Abdicasiis Cabaase (life plus 30 years). These defendants had also previously gone to sea in February 2010 with the purpose of capturing another vessel for ransom, but were instead, intercepted by the HMS Chatham of the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy. The remaining pirate from the attack on the USS Ashland, Abdi Abshir Osman, was sentenced to life plus 10 years.

This case was investigated by the FBI and the NCIS. Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph E. DePadilla for the Eastern District of Virginia and Trial Attorney Jerome Teresinski of the National Security Division’s Counterterrorism Section prosecuted the case. Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Benjamin L. Hatch prosecuted the case previously.

17-459
Topic:
Counterterrorism
National Security
Updated April 26, 2017

Terrorism: State Department Terrorist Designation of Mubarak Mohammed A Alotaibi


Media Note

Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
April 27, 2017

 


The Department of State has designated Mubarak Mohammed A Alotaibi as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist (SDGT) under Section 1(b) of Executive Order (E.O.) 13224, which imposes sanctions on foreign persons determined to have committed, or pose a significant risk of committing, acts of terrorism that threaten the security of U.S. nationals or the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States. As a consequence of this designation, U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions or dealings with Alotaibi, and all of his property and interests in property subject to United States jurisdiction is frozen.

Alotaibi is the Syria-based deputy leader of Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s (ISIS) affiliate in Saudi Arabia, which was designated by the U.S. Department of State as a SDGT under E.O. 13224 on May 19, 2016.

Today’s action notifies the U.S. public and the international community that Alotaibi has committed, or poses a significant risk of committing, acts of terrorism. Designations of terrorist individuals and groups expose and isolate organizations and individuals, and result in denial of access to the U.S. financial system. Moreover, designations can assist or complement the law enforcement actions of other U.S. agencies and other governments.

A list of State Department-designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations and SDGTs is available here: http://www.state.gov/j/ct/list/index.htm.

Identifiers:

Name: Mubarak Mohammed A Alotaibi
AKA: Abu Ghayth
AKA: Waqqas al-Jazrawi
DOB: January 8, 1986
POB: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Nationality: Saudi
Location: Syria

Somali Pirate Sentenced to Life for 2010 Attack on USS Ashland


U.S. Department of Justice

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Somali Pirate Sentenced to Life for 2010 Attack on USS Ashland

Mohamed Farah, 31, of Somalia, was sentenced to life plus 10 years in prison for engaging in piracy and committing other offenses pertaining to the attack on the USS Ashland, a U.S. Navy ship, in April 2010.

Today’s announcement was made by Acting Assistant Attorney General for National Security Mary B. McCord, U.S. Attorney Dana J. Boente for the Eastern District of Virginia, Special Agent in Charge Martin Culbreth of the FBI’s Norfolk Field Office in Virginia, and Special Agent in Charge Maureen Evans of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service’s (NCIS) Norfolk Field Office. The sentence was issued by U.S. District Judge Raymond A. Jackson.

A federal jury convicted Farah on Feb. 27, 2013. According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, Farah and five co-conspirators attacked the USS Ashland on April 10, 2010. Four of Farah’s co-conspirators were previously sentenced for their roles in the attack: Jama Idle Ibrahim (15 years in prison), Mohamed Ali Said (33 years), Mohamed Abdi Jama (life plus 30 years) and Abdicasiis Cabaase (life plus 30 years). These defendants had also previously gone to sea in February 2010 with the purpose of capturing another vessel for ransom, but were instead, intercepted by the HMS Chatham of the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy. The remaining pirate from the attack on the USS Ashland, Abdi Abshir Osman, was sentenced to life plus 10 years.

This case was investigated by the FBI and the NCIS. Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph E. DePadilla for the Eastern District of Virginia and Trial Attorney Jerome Teresinski of the National Security Division’s Counterterrorism Section prosecuted the case. Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Benjamin L. Hatch prosecuted the case previously.

17-459
Topic:
Counterterrorism
National Security
Updated April 26, 2017